Monthly Archives: December 2015

Happy New Year !!

Contributed by Robin Jones It’s New Year’s Eve! As a child I couldn’t wait to see if I could stay awake long enough to celebrate the turning of the clock from 11:59 pm to 12:00 am. I would always have 1 party popper left over from the 4th of July that I could pull the string on […]

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Immunotherapy

Contributed by Carol Huang The recent news about former president Jimmy Carter’s cancer has stopped spreading and is “responding well to treatment,” has drawn great attention to immunotherapy. Carter, 91, announced in August that four spots of cancer, melanoma had spread to his brain. Then in early December he was told that recent tests have […]

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Persistant Bacteria

Contributed by Bart C. Weimer, Ph.D. Food microbiologists have wrestled with the concept of non-culturable bacteria (NCB). It is well accepted in environmental microbiology the NCB are common. The expanded importance of the gut microbiome has raised this issue to the forefront. The implications of NCB for food safety are extensive. If bacteria become NC […]

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Pharmacomicrobiomics

Contributed by Ning Chin The U.S. National Institutes of Health has devoted a considerable amount of research funds on the Human Microbiome Project. Since 2008, a lot of research was done to identify the species of bacteria existing on the human body. Human microbiome is defined as the community of bacteria that coexist with humans […]

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Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers

Contributed by Roberto Torres Helicobacter pylori is a gram negative bacterium which colonizes the human gastric mucosa. In the 1980’s, through biopsies and histological observations, Doctors Robin Warren and Barry Marshall proposed that peptic ulcers were caused by a gastric epithelial infection by a similar Campylobacter bacterium, and now we classify it as Helicobacter. This proposal […]

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