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Thinking beyond library construction

Contributed by Carol Huang We have recently introduced a newer version of the Nanopore sequencing device, MinION MK 1B into the laboratory. It’s a portable, real-time sequencing device. The Nanopore MinION sequencing platform has great advanced features. Upon reach objectives, it can generate 10 to 20 GB DNA sequencing data from each flow cell. With […]

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CLC Genomics Workbench as a Tool Next Generation Sequencing Data

Contributed by Nguyet Kong CLC Genomics Workbench was designed to assist with many different Next Generation Sequencing bioinformatics applications from RNAseq, Transcriptomics, Metagenomics, Epigenomics and de novo assembly. The CLC Genomics Workbench is a user-friendly software that is easily used by scientist in the laboratory. The software allows to set up custom genomics workflow to fast-track […]

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Where are the receptors?

Contributed by Poyin Chen The first step in bacterial interaction with host cells is host recognition, followed by host adhesion. All of these initial interactions take place at the host cell surface; however, we have only scratched the surface of what is known about bacterial-host membrane interactions. This host recognition is usually initiated by a […]

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A new class of antimicrobial found in human mother’s milk

Contributed by Nguyet Kong A study from Vanderbilt University found that mothers milk doesn’t just give babies nutrients, but the sugars help protects them from bacterial infections, making this a new class of antimicrobial. Mother’s milk is consisting of different protein, fats, and sugars. This study has discovered that some carbohydrates possess antibacterial properties that […]

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The gut, the belly, the gastrointestinal tract, the second brain?!

Contributed by Poyin Chen Our gastrointestinal (GI) tract has the largest concentration of nerves, second only to the brain. Additionally, the vagus nerve runs through our GI tract. It wasn’t until recent years that researchers began to seriously consider the impact of GI homeostasis on altered brain functions such as Alzheimer’s disease and autism. Much […]

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Streptococcus might provoke colon cancer

Contributed by Nguyet Kong In a recent PLOS paper, researchers from Texas A&M found a bacterium, Streptococcus gallolyticus might lead to colon cancer by assisting with tumor growth that might cause more cancer-related deaths. Streptococcus has been known that there is an association with cancer, but little is known about Streptococcus role in that association. […]

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Herpesvirus Latency Bacterial Protection

Contributed by Azarene Foutouhi Herpesviridae is a large family of Herpesviruses which are named for their tendency to result in recurrent infections. After clearance of lytic infections, these viruses enter latency, a mechanism which allows them to resist elimination and establish recurrent lifelong infections. More than 90% of people have become infected with one of […]

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Cancer cells restructure genomes to reproduce more easily

Contributed by Nguyet Kong A group at Stowers Institute in Kansas City recently published their study in PLos Genetics describing that cancer cells restructuring in the ribosomal DNA to more easily reproduce copies. The rDNA cellular functions include regulating gene expression, chromosome organization, and chromatin factors. There not much known about the stability of rDNA, […]

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Climate Change and the Microbiome

Contributed by Azarene Foutouhi While the ecological implications of climate change are well established, recent studies have pointed to changes in the microbiome as a casualty of the warming Earth. Studies testing the effects of temperature changes on the gut microbiomes of ectotherms such as lizards, temperature increases resulted in significant changes in microbiome composition. […]

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